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 [Repair] Exhaust Manifold Replacement Guide « View previous topic :: View next topic » 
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DailyDrivenTJ.com
PostPosted: Tue Sep 08, 2009 6:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

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Joined: 09 Apr 2006
Posts: 1769

You can access the bolts from the bottom and I use boxed end or gear wrench with flexible head.

I was told that you can use extension with wobble joint and access the bolts from the gap between the fender and the frame.

HTH
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oren77
PostPosted: Fri Sep 18, 2009 10:22 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

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Joined: 09 Sep 2009
Posts: 3

HI,
How does one know if the manifold needs replacing? I am hearing noise from that spot, can it just need tightening or a new gasket on either end?
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DailyDrivenTJ.com
PostPosted: Fri Sep 18, 2009 6:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

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I know older model manifold has one piece gasket. If one section of the gasket is leaking, you have to replace the whole thing.

How does one know if the manifold needs replacing?

There is a couple of photos in the write up where I have shown where the crack is.

You can visually check for cracks. I have posted in different forums that using Seafoam can help diagnose leaking manifold as the Seafoam will leak out through cracks.

Also leaking manifold makes the engine really loud.

HTH
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oren77
PostPosted: Mon Oct 05, 2009 10:40 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

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Joined: 09 Sep 2009
Posts: 3

just finished the job yesterday...one question, when tightening the manifolds, screw #6 snapped in half, is there a suggestion as to what to do?
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DailyDrivenTJ.com
PostPosted: Mon Oct 05, 2009 11:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

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You can try bolt extractor. You will have to drill on the bolt itself and use the extractor on a drill with some torque. Google "bolt extractor".

How did you manage to break the bolt? Was it rusted badly? Where did it break exactly? Do you have some left sticking out? or did it break flush against the head?

Manifold bolts aren't meant to go on there all that tight. Be careful next time around to save yourself some headache.

mk
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RawTJ
PostPosted: Wed Oct 07, 2009 7:22 pm    Post subject: Re: Bottom bolts and fuel rail Reply with quote

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Joined: 07 Oct 2009
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hackley01 wrote:
Your write up is fantastic!

Unfortunately, I am stuck - I cannot get the fuel rail to pull free with the injectors. What should I do?


I agree, great writeup.

I'm unfortunately in the same boat as hackley and didn't see any suggestions. I cannot pull the rail/injectors out. I've pulled it pretty damn hard and it's not budging! I'm 6'5" and 240 lbs, so I can get a little ass on it.

It's a new (to me) 99 TJ with 105,000 miles. Scared I'm going to break the fuel rail - any suggestions are appreciated. I'll keep yanking on it and see what happens i guess.
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RawTJ
PostPosted: Wed Oct 07, 2009 7:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

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Well after pulling on it for a while, i found a pretty way to get the fuel rail out if anyone needs any help in the future.

I put a short piece of 2x4 (~1 ft) on top of the opening where the throttle body sits. I used a Stanley Wonderbar prybar (from when i was re-doing shingles). I just started at one end - stuck the short curved end of the prybar under the rail so the edge of it sat on the 2x4 and pulled on the long end. worked my way down about 3 spots and the whole thing pryed out pretty easy.

thanks again!
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Newbeme
PostPosted: Wed Oct 07, 2009 9:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

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Joined: 26 Jul 2006
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Location: Eastern Iowa

How's that saying go? Give a man a big enough lever and he could move the world. Nice use of ingenuity. I'm sure that tip will come in handy for others doing this job.

Also, Welcome tho the site. wave
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oren77
PostPosted: Sun Oct 11, 2009 12:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

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HI,
Is it necessary to run the last bolt #6? Having some problems removing the broken end.
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DailyDrivenTJ.com
PostPosted: Sun Oct 11, 2009 10:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

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I would say yes. See if you can get away without fixing it. If it does not leak, you are fine. My only concern is intake manifold not being seated fully causing vacuum leak. This will cause high idle.

mk
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picturemaker
PostPosted: Fri Dec 11, 2009 10:02 am    Post subject: Question about Exhaust Manifold Reply with quote

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Joined: 11 Dec 2009
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Location: San Diego

First off, this is a great write up on the manifold install - very helpful. I just got my new manifold and hope to dig into installing it soon. I have a question about the manifold itself, though, before I get started. How critical is it that the main flange (actually two pieces welded together in the center) on the new manifold is perfectly flat? The one I got is not - although it is extremely close. The two individual flanges are ever so slightly twisted relative to one another - so that I can see/feel that one side is very slightly higher than the other where they meet in the center. Also, if I lay a straight-edge flat across the length of both flanges together, I can see a slight gap in the center between the straight-edge and the flanges.

Looking at the pattern for tightening the bolts, it seems that torquing it down would take care of the gap at the center as long as the unit is at least a little bit flexible at the center weld. The slight elevation of one side at the seam might also be taken care of when tightened down - and the gasket might help as well.

I can imagine that, at the price these things sell for, it's unreasonable to expect the flanges to be perfectly aligned so I'm thinking it's probably fine - but, having never done this before and wanting the install to go as smoothly as possible, I don't want to just assume it's going to work - only to find that it won't after I've got everything apart or, worse, back together.

Any input much appreciated.
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DailyDrivenTJ.com
PostPosted: Fri Dec 11, 2009 7:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

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There is no telling, you might get lucky that the gasket will fit/deform enough for the mating surfaces to be sealed, it may not.

The torquing sequence should take care of some distortion too but there is also no telling either.

BTW Welcome!

mk
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picturemaker
PostPosted: Mon Jan 11, 2010 9:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

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Joined: 11 Dec 2009
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Location: San Diego

Finally got my new manifold installed on my yj today spin was really not that bad a job though it took me most of the day - including investigating and adjusting other things along the way as I had it apart. Once I got it done and started it up, I was kind of worried when I saw smoke coming out from under the hood. I figured out, I think, that the light blue colored smoke was just the oil burning off the new manifold as it heated up. After awhile it pretty much went away and I don't see any obvious signs of leaks. The original manifold was pretty beat - I couldn't see any obvious cracks but I think it is small and on the between the pipes at the collector. It had been welded (repaired) there and in at least one other spot previously before I got it. Didn't make a lot of difference in noise or power, although the jeep does do a little better on the highway - didn't help much at all with hills, though, but that's the fault of 235 tires and 3.07 gearing not the engine or exhaust.
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Socal97Tj40
PostPosted: Thu Mar 04, 2010 7:32 pm    Post subject: Thanks for the info. Reply with quote

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Joined: 04 Mar 2010
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Location: Hemet

Changed out the header on my TJ today. It was my first time and it took about three hours. All the info was right on, and the pictures definitely helped.

Thanks again from all of us newbs.


I'm editing because I have a question. I read of someone adding an extra hanger to the down pipe, to relieve some of the stress. Does anyone think this will help?
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chrisbl
PostPosted: Sat Mar 06, 2010 9:43 pm    Post subject: Thank You! Reply with quote

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Joined: 06 Mar 2010
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I followed your write up to replace my exhaust manifold today. Only took me about 3.5 hours. Your guide was flawless. Thanks so much.

The gear wrench was the best tool purchase I've ever made.

Thanks!!
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